Indian beach murder suspect says he is willing to return to Australia for trial

Indian beach murder suspect says he is willing to return to Australia for trial

Indian beach murder suspect says he is willing to return to Australia for trial

Delhi Police special cell officers escort Rajwinder Singh to Patiala court after he was arrested in connection with the 2018 murder of Australian national Toyah Cordingley (AFP via Getty Images)

Delhi Police special cell officers escort Rajwinder Singh to Patiala court after he was arrested in connection with the 2018 murder of Australian national Toyah Cordingley (AFP via Getty Images)

The Indian man accused of murdering an Australian woman on a Queensland beach four years ago has said he is willing to return to Australia to face trial.

Rajwinder Singh, 38, filed a “declaration of will” in a Delhi court to formally waive his right to challenge extradition to Australia, a development hailed as a landmark decision for the victim’s family.

Mr Singh was wanted for the murder of Toyah Cordingley, 24, who was found dead on Queensland’s Wangetti Beach on October 22, 2018 after what was described as a “frantic, brutal and sadistic” attack. “.

Singh, who traveled to India days after Cordingley’s murder, formally agreed to be extradited to Australia on Saturday.

He also claimed that he did not kill Cordingley and called himself an eyewitness to the crime in his first public statements since the incident.

Singh said he has a “message for Australians.”

Vanessa Gardiner, mother of Toyah Cordingley, whose body was found on Wangetti Beach in Queensland in Australia (AP)

Vanessa Gardiner, mother of Toyah Cordingley, whose body was found on Wangetti Beach in Queensland in Australia (AP)

“I want to go back,” Singh said. “Is he [Indian] judicial system that has been holding things back.”

Singh, who was accompanied by his father and mother in the audience, added: “I did not kill the woman.”

He said he wanted to “disclose all the details” to an Australian court after his return.

Asked by reporters why he apparently fled to India shortly after Cordingley’s death in 2018, Singh said he would explain the details during the trial, but added: “There were two murderers and two victims.”

Singh was arrested last month, the same month the Queensland government offered a $1 million reward for information leading to his location and arrest.

It was the largest bounty offered in state history to date.

Queensland Police Minister Mark Ryan welcomed the development, saying his statements of intent will prevent a legal battle over his extradition that could have dragged on for years in India’s overburdened judicial system.

“The process of getting justice for Toyah is reaching a particular milestone, and I look forward to seeing those proper processes continue,” he told reporters Monday.

“Obviously we need to be careful what we say publicly, but we are very hopeful that the processes and work done today will deliver the result the community wants to see.”

Mr Singh will face a Delhi magistrate again on Tuesday, where they will consider Mr Singh’s request to return to Australia.

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